Arts and Culture

collage-artsWhy is this important?

A thriving arts and cultural community is a sign of a city’s ability to innovate, to solve problems, to attract visitors, and to entice talented new residents from around the world. Toronto’s lively arts environment helps to welcome and integrate newcomers, celebrate our heritage, and imagine a better city. It is also a key sector that contributes to our local, provincial and national economies.

 

What are the trends?

The City’s 2015 budget upheld Council’s commitment to reaching $25 per capita arts funding by 2017. But even at that amount, Toronto’s spending on arts and culture will remain outshone by many other Canadian cities. Although professional employment in arts and culture in Toronto declined slightly in 2014, it remained higher than in 2012, and film, television, and other screen-based media production spending exceeded $1B for the fourth year in a row.

 

 

Data refer to the city of Toronto unless otherwise noted 2012 2013 2014
City budget for culture $54,790,00

(2013)

$55,420,000

(2014)

$62,580,500

(2015)[1]

Per capita municipal cultural investment $19.62

(2013)

$22.07

(2014)

$22.51

(2015)[2]

Professional employment in arts and culture (excluding self-employed) 32,330 34,660 32,970[3]
Film, television and other screen-based media production spending $1.2B $1.19B $1.23B[4]
Percentage of work force employed in cultural industries  (Toronto Region) 3.12% (2011) 2.94% (2012) 2.62% (2013)[5]

 

What’s new?

Toronto’s public library system, among the world’s largest and busiest, saw its busiest year since 2005 and opened its 100th branch in 2014. In-library use has fallen by 15% since 2010, but electronic circulation has increased by more than 1000%. Attendance at cultural events reflects our engagement in arts and culture and brings significant economic benefit to the city. At World Pride in 2014 attendees spent an estimated $719 million on Pride related purchases over the course of the ten-day festival.

Is the City funding Toronto’s cultural liveliness?

The City’s 2015 budget saw Council uphold its commitment to reaching $25 per capita arts funding by 2017:

  • In 2014, Toronto spent $22.51 per capita on arts, culture and heritage.[6]
  • The City’s 2015 operating budget allocated $62,580,500 to make possible arts and cultural services including:
    • the PANAMANIA festival: meant to showcase the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games, the complementary PANAMANIA festival featured 22 days of free, accessible cultural entertainment and activities (such as victory celebrations, concerts, dance performances, art exhibits, and nightly fireworks) throughout the Games.
    • the 10th edition of Scotiabank Nuit Blanche: the reputation of this free and highly valued Toronto event continues to grow, as does its coverage of the city’s neighbourhoods.[7]

 

snapshot

The Luminous Veil, an installation of LED lights that illuminate the Prince Edward Viaduct between Bloor St. E. and Danforth Ave., was one of many projects supported by City of Toronto’s 2015 Operating budget for arts and cultural services. From dusk till dawn the lights transform the bridge, changing in hue and intensity in response to the wind velocity and temperature and subways passing underneath.

 


 

  • The Toronto Arts Council (TAC) had requested an additional $1M in grants funding for 2015 to build on its priorities of growth and sustainability, community connections, and innovation and partnerships, but City staff instead recommended a $2M increase to fund arts and culture projects associated with the Pan Am/Parapan Am Games.
    • TAC believes its $1M request may be met in 2016 following the Games’ completion. Meanwhile its grants budget remains at just over $16M.[8]
    • In 2013, TAC funded arts organizations through 1,014 grants totalling $14.31M—38% more than the $10.3M awarded in 2012 (in 686 grants).[9]

 

arts-tacchart2


TAC Grant Programs, Applications Received and Funded, 2011-2013[10]

 

  • projectingEven at $25 per capita, Toronto’s spending on arts and culture will remain outshone by Montréal (with $55 per capita spending in 2009), Vancouver ($47), Calgary ($42) and Ottawa ($28).[11]

 

arts-tacchart3

 

City-Approved Phase-In of the $25 Per Capita Arts Funding Increase[12]

 

How do Torontonians contribute to, and benefit from the city’s exciting cultural environment?

Attendance at cultural events reflects Torontonians’ deep engagement in arts, culture, and heritage and brings significant economic benefit to the city:

  • Over 19 million people attended City-funded or City-programmed cultural events in 2014.
  • More than half a million people visit the 21 City-operated museums, historic sites, cultural centres and art galleries every year.[13]
  • Arts and culture contribute $11.3B annually to Toronto’s GDP.[14]

 

Torontonians see the arts as having a positive influence in the neighbourhoods they live in, their individual lives, and the city they call home:

  • Toronto Art Stats 2015 compiled by the Toronto Arts Foundations and Leger share results from an online survey of just over 500 Toronto residents conducted in January 2015 and three focus groups in January and February 2015.
  • On a regular basis, 71% of Torontonians attend arts-related programs or events or visit cultural locations. Those under the age of 54 are more likely to attend than those 55 and up (81% versus 61%).
  • Concerts (53%), museums (52%) and film showings and festivals (both at 47%) are the top three events attended on a regular basis. Dance (19%) and readings (6%) are the only events to fall under the 40% mark.
  • A quarter (26%) of Torontonians go beyond attendance with their engagement in the arts. The most popular contribution is donating to an arts organization (9%), followed by being a member of an amateur arts group (7%), and being a student in arts classes or lessons (6%).[15]

 

arts-engagement-beyond-attendance
Engagement Beyond Attendance in the Arts, 2015[16]

 

  • 69% of Torontonians appreciate the contribution that local artists make to the city and 43% reported they would like to get more involved in the arts in Toronto.
  • The overwhelming majority of Torontonians (97%) see at least one benefit that the arts provide to the city, such as
    • attracting tourists, 79%;
    • making the city a better place to live, 63%;
    • creating employment, 59%; and
    • attracting people to move here, 33%.

 

arts-benefits-of-the-arts

Benefits of the Arts to Toronto, 2015[17]

 

  • 89% of Torontonians see at least one benefit that the arts provide to themselves. 66%, for example, report that the arts expose them to new ideas, and 46% say they make them feel proud of their city.
  • Over half (52%) of Torontonians are very likely to take an out-of-town visitor to an arts-related activity, with top picks including museums, galleries, and festivals.

 

arts-top-fice-arts-activities

Top Five Arts Activities for Out-of-Town Guests, 2015[18]

 

  • 68% of Torontonians say that local artists add value to our society and therefore should be appropriately compensated, and 57% say that the arts should be a priority for local government.
  • Despite these high levels of interest and engagement, a significant majority (87%) of GTA residents face at least one barrier to attending arts programming.
    • Cost (63%) and lack of time (40%) are the biggest factors that make it difficult for people to attend arts events, visit arts locations, or participate in arts activities. Others include:
      • distance from home, 30%;
      • unawareness of what’s going on, 15%;
      • inaccessibility of venues to those with mobility issues, 6%.[19]
    • 2009 American research found that people who attended art galleries or live performances, or read literature, were more likely to vote, volunteer, and take part in community events, and that 58% of adults who visited an art museum or gallery volunteered in their communities, compared to only 24% of those who did not.[20]

 

Toronto elementary schools offer better access to arts education than many Ontario schools, although access to some specialist teachers is still very low:

  • Exposure to arts education for young people can build capacity for imaginative and critical thinking along with open-mindedness, which are all important skills for living productive lives as adults.
  • Two-thirds (66%) of Toronto elementary schools report having a music teacher; 43% employ a full-time music teacher.
  • Far fewer elementary schools report having a visual arts (29%) or drama (18%) teacher.[21]

 

 

How engaged are Torontonians by major sporting events?

 

globalData analysts have quantified “that feeling of hopelessness” that many Toronto sports fans feel by naming us the second most miserable sports city in North America:

  • Compiling statistics on US and Canadian cities having three or more major league basketball, baseball, football, or hockey teams, and using metrics including playoff appearances, playoff series wins, and championship wins (favouring more recent wins), The 10 and 3 determined a “misery score” for each city. Only Cleveland fared worse than Toronto.
  • Toronto’s misery is based primarily on the losing seasons of its three teams. The Maple Leafs have seen only one playoff season (2013) since they won in 1967, and the Blue Jays none since they won in 1993. Though as of this Report’s 2015 publication date, 2015 looks promising. The Raptors, meanwhile, so far display “unfulfilled promise.”[22]
  • The Leafs saw their lowest attendance in 16 years and ended a 13-year sellout streak this past season when only 18,366 fans attended a March 23 game.[23]

 

arts-misery-score

Toronto’s “Sports Fan Misery Score,” 2015[24]

 

Toronto has much to be proud of in terms of some preliminary metrics pertaining to the outcome of the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games, which were hosted by the city and neighbouring municipalities in July and August 2015:

  • Supported by more than 20,000 volunteers, the Games were the largest multi-sport event in Canadian history in terms of athletes competing—over 7,000.
  • Over all, Canada earned 385 medals during both Pan Am and Parapan Am Games events. [25]
    • Canada placed second in the Parapan Am medal count with a total of 217 (78 gold, 69 silver, and 60 bronze), behind the US, which earned 265 medals. [26]
    • More than 5,500 Pan Am athletes competed in in 36 sports.[28]
    • The Parapan Am Games component of the event were the largest ever in its history, with 1,608 athletes from 28 countries competing in 15 parasports, all of which are Paralympic qualifiers for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games.[27]

 

 

How well does our world-class library system serve the city, and how is usage changing in the 21st century?

 

The Toronto Public Library (TPL) continues to be among the world’s largest and busiest public library systems offering services in complex, diverse, urban environments:

  • 2014 was a banner year for the TPL.
    • It opened its 100th branch, in the Scarborough Civic Centre.[29]
    • It increased the number of programs offered by 9.3%.
    • And, despite the closures of eight branches for part of the year for renovations, TPL saw its busiest year since 2005. Driven by increases in e-circulation, wireless usage, virtual visits, and program attendance, total uses surpassed 100 million, up 18.7% from 2007.[30]

arts-libraryuse

10-Year Trends in Toronto Public Library Usage, 2005-2014[31]

 

  • While browsing and borrowing books continue to be key drivers of library activity, Torontonians also visit branches to use computers and access wireless internet, to study and to work, to network and to attend programs and community events.
    • Although total visits were down in 2014, by 0.8% (18,335,910 compared to 18,485,372 in 2013), they were up 7.5% over 2005.
  • In-library use of materials is rapidly falling in favour of electronic circulation.
    • In-library use of materials fell 1.2% in 2014 (from 6,709,668 in 2013 to 6,631,255), while electronic circulation rose 65.7% (to 3,488,252, up from 2,105,515 in 2013).
    • Since 2010 in-library use has fallen 15.1%, but electronic circulation has increased by 1,253.5%.[32]
  • Other notable increases in library usage in 2014 included:
    • 28.99% increase in wireless sessions (to 2,328,664), reinforcing the library’s vital role in bridging the digital divide, as participating in school, work, and lifelong learning or accessing government information and services increasingly requires a computer with access to large bandwidth;
    • 5.2% increase in program attendance, with a 10.1% increase for programs for school-age children (almost double the 5.8% increase the previous year) and a 27.6% increase for preschool programs;
      • Over the past five years the number of programs offered has increased by 17.7% and attendance has increased by 7.4%.
    • 116.4% increase in the use of the “Book a Librarian” service, which allows patrons to meet with a librarian for help (with research, library information, career information, or homework, for example); and
    • 11.8% increase in virtual visits (reaching 29,966,097), reflecting the importance of online access to information, services, and collections.
      • Total virtual visits—visits to TPL’s main site and specialized sites (e.g., Kids Space), e-content sites (including e-books and e-magazines), licensed databases, and the library’s online and social media channels—have increased 11% over the last five years.[33]

arts-libvisits

Five-Year Trend in TPL Virtual Visits, 2010-2014[34]

Note: The catalogue merged with the TPL website in 2011, creating a more efficient search and change in counting.

 

  • In 2013 (the latest year for which comparative data is available) TPL again ranked first in North America in circulation and visits per capita among libraries serving populations of 2 million or more.
    • globalAmong these large urban systems TPL had the greatest number of branches in 2013 and tied with Chicago for highest square footage of library space per capita.
  • Among Canadian libraries serving a population over 500,000, TPL had the highest overall circulation and visits, and per capita, ranked sixth in circulation, third in visits, and second in square footage of library space.
  • Of the nine municipal libraries voluntarily participating in the 2013 Ontario Municipal Benchmarking Initiative, TPL placed second in library use per capita, and ranked third in operating cost per use ($2.04, above the median of $1.83; in 2012 it was just above the median at $1.96).[35]

arts-opcostsperuse

Total Operating Cost per Use, TPL vs. 9 Municipal Libraries, 2013[36]

Every dollar invested in the library generates a significant return for the city:

  • A 2013 report from the Martin Prosperity Institute (at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto) put dollar values on the library’s economic benefit to the city. The economic impact study, the first of its kind in Canada and requested by the TPL Board and City Council, clearly demonstrated that TPL delivers a strong return on investment.
    • For every $1 invested in the library, Torontonians received almost six times the value: $5.63.
    • The direct benefits of a library membership made it worth $502 for the 72% of Torontonians who used it.
      • 44% of the adult population were frequent or heavy users of library branches (defined by 11 or more visits in the previous year).
    • The average value of each open hour at a branch was almost four times its average cost: the average open hour generated $2,515 in direct benefits while costing approximately $653. [37]

 

How do the arts and culture contribute to the city’s economic health?

Arts and culture provide employment and professional development, marketing, and advocacy opportunities for creatives:

  • Although professional employment in arts and culture in Toronto declined 4.9% in 2014 to 32,970 people (down from 34,660 in 2013), it remains 2% higher than in 2012.
  • When the self-employed are included, the number of professionals in arts and culture almost doubles, to 65,170 in 2014 (down from 65,670 in 2013 but also higher than 2012’s 61,780).[38]
  • Employment in cultural industries in the Region was 83,800 in 2013 or 2.68% of total industries, from 93,900 or 3.12% of total industries in 2011. [39] But overall employment in cultural industries as a percent of total industries was higher in the Region than at the provincial level for 2010–2013.[40]

 

On-location filming in Toronto exceeded $1B for the fourth straight year.

  • Toronto’s screen-based industry (film, television, commercials, and animation) continued its success in 2014, with domestic and international production companies investing a record $1.23B in on-location filming in the city, a 4.3% increase over 2013’s $1.18B.
  • Television series continued to dominate, accounting for over two-thirds (79.4%) of total investment (or $757.4M).
    • The growth in domestic TV series spending accounted for an unprecedented 21% increase over 2013 in investment in major domestic productions, which exceeded $500M for the second consecutive year, reaching $652.25M.
  • Also unprecedented was the level of growth in the city in commercial production investment—$195M in 2014, a 48% increase from the previous year.
  • On-location shooting days also increased over 2013, by a healthy 19%.[41]

 

In addition to its impressive film, television, and digital media production, Toronto is now home to over 80 film festivals, including TIFF, which draws big stars and big spending:

  • The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) has grown from a small 10-day event with an audience of 35,000 in 1976 into a cultural institution that contributes significantly to Toronto’s international reputation.
    • The third largest film festival in the world, and the largest public film festival in the world, TIFF annually attracts well over a million attendees (including more than 1,100 media) from over 130 countries across all its activities.[42]
    • In 2014 1.83 million people attended all TIFF activities.[43]
  • According to Moneris, Canada’s largest credit and debit card processor, Toronto saw a 12.1% gain in overall consumer spending during TIFF 2014 (in comparison to a 10-day non-festival period in August). This represents a 7.8% increase over TIFF 2013.
    • The biggest week-over-week spending increases were in the apparel category, with an 18.3% increase in dollars spent, specialty retail with a 14.7% increase, and travel with a 12.1% increase.
    • The Entertainment District saw the highest increase in spending week-over-week and year-over-year at 13.1% and 16.3% respectively. The Fashion District showed 7.7% and 3.9% growth for the same periods, and the Bloor/Yorkville area only 1.4% and 6.0%, a shift in spending that reflects the move of TIFF operations from Yorkville to the downtown core.[44]

 

globalToronto’s Pride festival had major impacts and achievements in 2014:

  • Celebrating the diversity of the LGBTQ* community, Toronto hosts the largest pride festival in North America, and is consistently ranked in the top 10 biggest and best pride celebrations globally.[45]
  • Alongside Toronto’s own 34thannual Pride Festival, the fourth World Pride festival was held in Toronto in 2014 – the first time World Pride has been held in North America.
    • Pride Toronto estimates that in 2014 there were 2 million visits to Pride related events, and that Pride attendees spent an estimated $719 million on Pride related purchases over the course of the ten-day festival, and directly contributed almost $313 million to Toronto’s GDP. [46]

 


 

[1] City of Toronto, Economic Development and Culture. Special request.

[2] City of Toronto, Economic Development and Culture. Special request.

[3] City of Toronto. (2014). Labour Force Survey Data—Occupational Profiles, Tab o027. Last accessed June 10, 2015, from:

http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=175e3c6d9c8ba310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD&vgnextchannel=e71032d0b6d1e310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD.

[4] City of Toronto. (2014). Advancing Toronto’s Prosperity, Opportunity and Liveability – Toronto’s On-screen Industry: 2014 – The Year In Review. Last accessed June 10, 2015, from: http://www1.toronto.ca/City%20Of%20Toronto/Economic%20Development%20&%20Culture/Business%20Pages/Filming%20in%20Toronto/Shared%20content/FilmStats_2014_presentation16Apr2015.pdf.

[5] NVS Table VII-2-b: Employment in Cultural Industries for Vital Signs Communities by CMA and Economic Region,  2000, 2010-2013.

[6] City of Toronto. Economic Development and Culture. Special request.

[7] City of Toronto. Economic Development and Culture. Special request.

[8] Toronto Arts Council. (2015). Toronto Budget 2015: Arts Funding Budget. Last accessed September 22, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartscouncil.org/advocates-for-the-arts/toronto-budget-2015.

[9] Toronto Arts Council. (n.d.) TAC Impact. Last accessed September 1, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartscouncil.org/tac-impact.

[10] Toronto Arts Council. (n.d.) TAC Impact. Last accessed September 1, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartscouncil.org/tac-impact.

[11] Toronto Arts Foundation. (2014). Toronto Arts Facts. Last accessed September 1, 2015 from:  http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Facts/TorontoArtsFacts.pdf.

[12] Toronto Arts Council. (2015). Toronto Budget 2015: Arts Funding Budget. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartscouncil.org/advocates-for-the-arts/toronto-budget-2015.

[13] City of Toronto. Economic Development and Culture. Special request.

[14] Toronto Arts Foundation. (2014). Toronto Arts Facts. Last accessed September 1, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Facts/TorontoArtsFacts.pdf.

[15] Toronto Arts Foundation and Leger. (2015). Toronto Art Stats 2015. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Stats%202015/Toronto-Arts-Stats-2015-Booklet-FINAL-web.pdf.

[16] Toronto Arts Foundation and Leger. (2015). Toronto Art Stats 2015. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Stats%202015/Toronto-Arts-Stats-2015-Booklet-FINAL-web.pdf.

[17] Toronto Arts Foundation and Leger. (2015). Toronto Art Stats 2015. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Stats%202015/Toronto-Arts-Stats-2015-Booklet-FINAL-web.pdf.

[18] Toronto Arts Foundation and Leger. (2015). Toronto Art Stats 2015. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Stats%202015/Toronto-Arts-Stats-2015-Booklet-FINAL-web.pdf.

[19] Toronto Arts Foundation and Leger. (2015). Toronto Art Stats 2015. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Stats%202015/Toronto-Arts-Stats-2015-Booklet-FINAL-web.pdf.

[20] Toronto Arts Foundation. (2014). Toronto Arts Facts. Last accessed July 7, 2015, from http://www.torontoartsfoundation.org/tac/media/taf/Research/Toronto%20Arts%20Facts/TorontoArtsFacts.pdf.

[21] People for Education. (2015). Special Report for Vital Signs 2015, results from Annual Survey of Ontario Schools 2015. Special request.

[22] CBC News. (2015.) Toronto named 2nd most miserable sports city in North America. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-named-2nd-most-miserable-sports-city-in-north-america-1.3025433.

[23] Chris Battaglia, The Score. (2015). Maple Leafs’ 13-year sellout streak ends Monday vs. Wild. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.thescore.com/nhl/news/729216.

[24] CBC News. (2015). Toronto named 2nd most miserable sports city in North America. Last accessed September 29, 2015 from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-named-2nd-most-miserable-sports-city-in-north-america-1.3025433.

[25] Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. All Sports Medal Count. (2015). Last accessed August 25, 2015, from http://results.toronto2015.org/IRS/en/general/medal-count.htm and http://results.toronto2015.org/PRS/en/general/medal-count.htm.

[26] Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. All Sports Medal Count. (2015). Last accessed August 25, 2015, from http://results.toronto2015.org/IRS/en/general/medal-count.htm and http://results.toronto2015.org/PRS/en/general/medal-count.htm.

[27] Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. About the Parapan Am Games. (2015). Last accessed August 25, 2015, from http://www.toronto2015.org/about-us/parapan-am-games.

[28] Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. About Us. (2015). Last accessed August 25, 2015, from http://www.toronto2015.org/about-us/pan-am-games.

[29] Toronto Public Library. Toronto Public Library Opens 100th Branch in Scarborough [news release]. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from:  http://torontopubliclibrary.typepad.com/news_releases/2015/05/toronto-public-library-opens-100th-branch-in-scarborough-.html.

[30] Toronto Public Library. (2015). Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19.pdf.

[31] Toronto Public Library. Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Attachment 1: Trends in Library Usage: 2005 to 2014. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19_1.pdf.

[32] Toronto Public Library. (2015). Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19.pdf.

[33] Toronto Public Library. (2015). Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19.pdf.

[34] Toronto Public Library. (2015). Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19.pdf.

[35] Toronto Public Library. (2015). Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19.pdf.

[36] Toronto Public Library. (2015). Staff Report: 2014 Annual Performance Measures and Benchmarking. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2015/apr20/19.pdf.

[37] Martin Prosperity Institute. (2013). So Much More: The Economic Impact of the Toronto Public Library System on the City of Toronto. Last accessed July 21, 2015, from http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/content/about-the-library/pdfs/board/meetings/2013/dec09/10_1.pdf.

[38] City of Toronto. (2014). Labour Force Survey Data—Occupational Profiles, Tab o027. Last accessed June 10, 2015, from:

http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=175e3c6d9c8ba310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD&vgnextchannel=e71032d0b6d1e310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD.

[39] NVS Table VII-2-b: Employment in Cultural Industries for Vital Signs Communities by CMA and Economic Region, 2000, 2008-2013.

[40] NVS Table VII-2-b: Employment in Cultural Industries for Vital Signs Communities by CMA and Economic Region, 2000, 2010–2013.

[41] City of Toronto. (2015). On-location filming in Toronto exceeds $1 billion for fourth straight year [news release]. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://bit.ly/1OIbcJY.

[42] TIFF. (2014). TIFF 2013 Annual Report. Last accessed July 8, 2015, from https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.tiff.net/content/pdf/TIFF2013AnnualReport/offline/download.pdf.

[43] TIFF. (2015). Annual Report 2014. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: https://cloud.3dissue.com/44705/45247/78445/2014AnnualReport/index.html.

[44] Moneris. (2014). Toronto economy big winner at TIFF 2014. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://insights.moneris.com/h/i/73510719-toronto-economy-big-winner-at-tiff-2014; Toronto Star. (2014). TIFF 2014 spending rose 12.1 per cent: report. Last accessed September 20, 2015 from: http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/movies/2014/09/23/tiff_2014_spending_rose_121_per_cent_report.html.

[45] George Brown College, Institute without Boundaries. (2014). The Atlas of One Delta. Last accessed July 4, 2015 from: http://institutewithoutboundaries.ca/?portfolio=atlas-of-one-delta.

[46] Pride Toronto. (2015). Special Request.

 

 

The following groups are addressing issues relating to arts and culture through their innovative community-based programs.

 

Click on the name of the group to be directed to their profile on the Community Knowledge Centre to learn more about how.

 

Art City in St. James Town – Providing free and accessible multidisciplinary arts programming

Art Gallery of Ontario – Bringing people together with art to experience and understand the world in new ways

Art Starts – Creating social change through community art projects

Arts Access Fund – Providing opportunities for arts engagement to young people

ArtReach Toronto – Giving young artists access to resources, mentorship and skill building opportunities

Arts Etobicoke – Creating space for the arts through a community arts council located in a beautiful storefront gallery

Arts for Children and Youth – Offering hands on, community and school based arts education

Artscape – Creating shared space for non-profit and arts based orgs through urban development

Bata Shoe Museum – Sharing compelling cultural stories by using footwear as the point of entry to cultures of the world

Buddies in Bad Times Theatre – Developing and presenting artists’ voices in the LGBTQ* community

Cahoots Theatre Projects – Interdisciplinary arts investigating the intersections of Canada’s diversity.

Canadian Journalists for Free Expression – Championing the rights of journalists and media professionals

Canadian Stage – One of the country’s leading not-for-profit contemporary theatre companies

Children’s Peace Theatre – Creating a culture of peace and transformative justice by engaging children

Clay & Paper Theatre – Bringing neighbourhoods together by producing community-driven plays, pageants and parades in public spaces

Coleman Lemieux & Compagnie – Professional dance organization that presents locally and globally

Creative Trust – Building the financial health and resilience of Toronto’s creative performing arts

CUE – A radical, arts initiative enabling young marginalized artists to develop art exhibitions

Diaspora Dialogues Charitable Society – Supporting creative writing that reflects our city’s diversity

Drum Artz Canada – Mentorship and creative expression through percussion and music

Dusk Dances –  Curates high quality contemporary and traditional dance events in public parks.

Framework – Delivering high-quality volunteer engagement events (Timeraiser)

The Gardiner Museum – Leading arts education and therapy through clay and ceramics

Harbourfront Centre – Nurturing the growth of new cultural expression and artistic cultural exchange

Hot Docs – Advancing the creative imprint of documentary film

imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival – Celebrating the latest works by Indigenous peoples

Inner City Angels – Bringing imaginative interdisciplinary arts programs to children in Toronto

Inside Out LGBT Film Festival – Changing lives through the promotion, production and exhibition of film by and about LGBT people

Jumblies Theatre – Makes art in everyday places with and about the people and stories found there

Lost Lyrics – Providing alternative education through arts to racialized youth in ‘priority neighbourhoods’

Luminato Festival – Reflecting the diverse character of Toronto through n annual, multi-disciplinary arts festival

MABELLEarts – Bringing together local communities to make art, tell stories, and creatively transform their public space

Mammalian Diving Reflex – Interactive performances that occur beyond the walls of the theatre

Manifesto Community Projects – Uniting and empowering diverse young people through hip-hop culture

National Ballet of Canada – Performs the masterworks of classical and contemporary

Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto – Building the collective capacity of Aboriginal women

Newcomer Women’s Services Toronto – Delivering educational and employment opportunities for immigrant women and their children

Nightwood Theatre – Propelling women to the top of their craft in Canadian Theatre

No. 9: Contemporary Art & the Environment – Uses art and design to bring awareness to environmental concerns

Regent Park Focus – bringing best practices in training and mentorship of youth to broadcasting and digital arts

Regent Park School of Music – Providing quality, affordable music education to underprivileged youth

The Remix Project – Levelling the playing field in creative industries for youth from marginalized and underserved communities

San Romanoway Revitalization – Fostering a sense of belonging in residents of all ages and backgrounds

Scarborough Arts – Developing programming and cultural initiatives in collaboration with the community

Shakespeare in Action – Enhancing arts and education through exploring and performing Shakespeare

Sistema Toronto – Inspiring children to realize their full potential through free, ensemble-based music lessons

SKETCH Working Arts – Creating a safe space for arts and creativity for young, marginalized people

Soulpepper Theatre Company – Creating a home in Toronto for the great dramatic works of our collective cultural inheritance

Story Planet – Encouraging young people to tell their stories through workshops at a story making centre

Toronto Public Library Foundation – Providing essential resources for the enhancement of the Toronto Public Library

UNITY Charity – Empowering youth to use artistic self-expression to make positive life

UrbanArts – Engaging youth in community development through the arts

UforChange – Inspiring newcomer and Canadian youth through arts-based community-building

Vermont Square Parent-Child Mother Goose Program – Fostering parent-child bonding and literacy through a rich oral language experience

Words In Motion – Using the arts to help children and their families achieve their full potential

Workman Arts Project of Ontario – Developing and supporting artists with mental illness and addiction issues